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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

3 edition of Landslides and debris flows east of Mount Pleasant, Utah, 1983 and 1984 found in the catalog.

Landslides and debris flows east of Mount Pleasant, Utah, 1983 and 1984

Landslides and debris flows east of Mount Pleasant, Utah, 1983 and 1984

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Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey in [Reston, Va.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Landslides -- Utah -- Mount Pleasant Region

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Elliott W. Lips ; prepared in cooperation with the Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, contract number 85-5016
    SeriesOpen-file report -- 85-382, U.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 85-382
    ContributionsUtah Geological and Mineral Survey, Geological Survey (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13609940M

    A variety of debris flows called “lahars”—a mixture of volcanic ash and water— are specific to volcanic activity and are often the major hazard experienced in a volcanic episode. Although earthquakes can initiate debris flows, the major causes of landslides in .   Landslide Susceptibility Maps .. 23 Landslide Hazard Maps .. 25 CHAPTER 5-Transferring and Encouraging the Use of Information .. 26 Information Transfer .. 26 Users of Landslide Hazard Information .. 27 Developing an Information Base: Sources of Landslide Hazard.

    The term landslide or less frequently, landslip, refers to several forms of mass wasting that include a wide range of ground movements, such as rockfalls, deep-seated slope failures, mudflows, and debris ides occur in a variety of environments, characterized by either steep or gentle slope gradients, from mountain ranges to coastal cliffs or even underwater, in which case they are. The vast majority of landslides, debris flows and wildfires occur on these public lands with Mount Pleasant Spring City Sterling Wales Manti Damage from landslides in , Fire Station Earthquake, fire Sewer treatment plant Earthquake, flooding.

      Debris flows that occur in the bay region are fast-moving downslope flows of mud that may include rocks, vegetation, and other debris. These flows begin during intense rainfall as shallow landslides on steep slopes. The rapid movement and sudden arrival of debris flows pose a hazard to life and property during and immediately following the. Information about landslides and landslide mapping. Diagram by J. Appleby, R. Kilbourne, and C. Wills after Varnes, A debris slide is a landslide of coarse-grained soil, most common in unconsolidated sandy or gravelly units, but also are common in residual soils that form from in-place weathering of relatively hard rock.


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Landslides and debris flows east of Mount Pleasant, Utah, 1983 and 1984 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Landslides and debris flows east of Mount Pleasant, Utah, and [microform] / by Elliott W. Lips ; prepared in cooperation with the Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, contract number U.S.

Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey [Reston, Va.?] Australian/Harvard Citation. Lips, Elliott W.

& Utah Geological and Mineral Survey. Get this from a library. Landslides and debris flows east of Mount Pleasant, Utah, and [Elliott W Lips; Utah Geological and Mineral Survey.; Geological Survey (U.S.)].

Landslides and debris flows east of Mount Pleasant, Utah, AND By Elliott W. Lips Introduction In the mountainous terrain of central Utah, several hundred landslides, including debris flows^, resulted from melting of above-normal snowpacks during the springs of and One area of abundunt landslide activity was along the Author: E.W.

Lips. Landslides, debris flows, and floods ravaged parts of central Utah during and (Anderson and others, ). The Thistle landslide () dammed Spanish Fork Canyon, and the resulting lake flooded the town of Thistle (fig.

Cl) and threatened communities Cited by: 2. An average of people are killed by landslides each year in the United States.

The worldwide death toll per year due to landslides is in the thousands. Most landslide fatalities are from rock falls, debris flows, or volcanic debris flows (called lahars). Twenty-three people were killed, at least injured, and more than homes were.

Preliminary Computer Simulation of SR Landslide by USGS. Landslide Hazards Post-wildfire debris flow: Fish Fire, Las Lomas Canyon by USGS. Post-wildfire Flood and. slide, and flow. Typical landslides in Utah include slides, rock falls, debris flows, and earth flows.

In Utah, many landslides move slowly, but some move quickly with devastating results. Debris flows, which are a type of landslide having very high water content, can travel at speeds greater than 30 to 50 miles per hour.

Causes of Landslides. A landslide is defined as the movement of a mass of rock, debris, or earth down a slope. Landslides are a type of "mass wasting," which denotes any down-slope movement of soil and rock under the direct influence of gravity.

The term "landslide" encompasses five modes of slope movement: falls, topples, slides, spreads, and flows. These are further subdivided by the type of. Klauk, R.H.,Springs and debris flow evaluation for the Manilla Culinary Water Company, Utah County, Utah, in Harty, K.M., compiler, Technical reports for Site Investigation Section: Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Report of Investigationp.

Landslides and Debris Flows Greg wvdirtboy; videos; Flash Flood Footage / Erosion Shots Utah Monsoon by rankinstudio. Bank collapse. Debris flow at Mount Rainier by.

For example, the landslide at Utah in the United States resulted in rehabilitation cost of about $ million. The annual loss as a result of landslides in U.S. stands at an estimated $ billion. Decimation of infrastructure; The force flow of mud, debris, and rocks as a result of a landslide can cause serious damage to property.

Of course, the Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption on caused the largest landslide in U.S. history and its debris flows resulted in the deaths of dozens of people (57 fatalities. Landslides and mudslides.

Learn about landslide history, hazards, research, predictions and building practices to minimize risks. Landslides and Debris Flows Landslides and Debris Flows. Category: Geoscience Data Type: GIS Data Layer Steward(s): UGS Abstract: Landslide debris flow paths, deposition areas, and scarps of Utah.

Data represents a compilation of existing mapping of landslides atpreand new landslide specific data depicting a more detailed inventory atpost Debris flow events are severely underrepresented due to the difficulty in distinquishing between discrete debris flow events in Arizona's rugged canyons and drainages.

The collective footprint of landslide deposits is more than sq. miles (2, sq. kilometers); an area equivalent to that of Phoenix and Tucson combined. Debris flows have caused significant damage to structures and property and resulted in at least 15 deaths in Utah since Damage to 29 homes and two businesses from the SeptemSantaquin fire-related debris flow totaled about $, As debris flows are both a landslide and flooding hazard, fatalities are included in both.

Landslide: Masses of rock, earth or debris moving down a of a landslide as a large chunk of material that slides down a surface. Debris flow: Rivers of rock, earth and other debris saturated with addition of water makes debris flows more fluid than landslides. Landslides generally happen in areas where they have occurred in the past.

Learn about your area’s landslide risk. Landslides can also be referred to as mudslides, debris flows, mudflows or debris avalanches. Debris flows and other landslides onto roadways are common during rainstorms. The Nile landslide blocked the Naches River and covered State Route Washington is one of the most landslide-prone states in the country, with hundreds to thousands of events each year.

The direct cost of landslide damage includes the repair of roads and property and the loss of life. Indirect costs, such as loss of property value and tax revenue, and environmental.

Landslides and Debris Flow (13) Utah Geological Association (36) Geologic Maps. Geologic Maps (13)Geologic Maps (70) Landslides and Debris Flow. Landslide Hazards In Utah: Rock-fall hazards in Utah: The Creekside Drive area landslides, Mountain Green, Morgan County, Utah.

previously mapped landslides throughout Utah. The re-sult consists of 46 ,scale landslide maps created from three feature classes (LandslidePolygons, Landslid-eScarps, and DebrisFlowPaths). The layers include o landslide deposits in addition to landslide scarps and debris-flow travel paths throughout the state.

Also in.Landslides can occur quickly, often with little notice. The best way to prepare is to stay informed about changes in and around your area that could signal that a landslide or debris flow is likely to occur.

For example, when a wildfire creates a “burn scar” on a slope, the chance of debris flow and flooding increases for years.Scientists have had trained satellites orbiting the planets to view the landslides; The May eruption of Mount St.

Helens caused the largest landslide in history. A rockslide debris avalanche large enough to fill million dump trucks to the brim traveled about 14 miles, destroying, amoung many things, nine highway bridges.